Libyan International Medical University Journal

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 84--91

Post-thyroidectomy permanent hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism: frequency and risk factors


MS Elsaeiti1, KD Alsaeiti2 
1 Consultant endocrinologist, Alhawary General Hospital. Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Benghazi, Libya
2 Jamhorya hospital-Benghazi, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Benghazi, Libya

Correspondence Address:
K D Alsaeiti
Jamhorya hospital-Benghazi, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Benghazi
Libya

Background: Hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication after thyroidectomy and the main reason for frequent outpatients' visits; however, there is a poor understanding of its outcomes, and no clear follow-up strategies are available. We aimed to evaluate the frequency and risk factors of post-thyroidectomy hypocalcemia hypoparathyroidism in Libyan patients. Methods: A case series study was conducted. The serum calcium and parathyroid hormone level (PTH) were measured at least 8 months post thyroidectomy. Results: 124 patients were reviewed in this study; 19 (15.3 %) were males and 105 (84.7 %) were females. 30.6 % of males and 13.7% of females developed hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism. Total thyroidectomy (TT) was performed in 62.9 % of all patients, while 24.2% of all patients underwent near total thyroidectomy (NTT). 12.1% of all patients underwent bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy (BST) and 1 patient underwent hemi thyroidectomy (0.8%). The risk of hypocalcemia was higher in patients with malignant thyroid disease in comparison to benign thyroids (45.8 % vs. 27% of patients). Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) was the most common cause of both hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism (45.5% for both) followed by Graves' disease (22.2% and 14.8% for hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism respectively). Hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism were more frequent in patients who underwent TT (19.2%), as compared to patients who underwent NTT (6.6 %). Among nine patients who were operated on twice, three patients had hypocalcemia, and two of them were found to be hypoparathyroid; one case is diagnosed with Graves' disease, while the other was diagnosed as PTC. Conclusion: Total thyroidectomy, and re-operation are associated with increased prevalence of permanent hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism when compared to less extensive thyroid resection modes.


How to cite this article:
Elsaeiti M S, Alsaeiti K D. Post-thyroidectomy permanent hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism: frequency and risk factors.Libyan Int Med Univ J 2017;2:84-91


How to cite this URL:
Elsaeiti M S, Alsaeiti K D. Post-thyroidectomy permanent hypocalcemia and hypoparathyroidism: frequency and risk factors. Libyan Int Med Univ J [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Nov 29 ];2:84-91
Available from: http://journal.limu.edu.ly/article.asp?issn=2519-139X;year=2017;volume=2;issue=1;spage=84;epage=91;aulast=Elsaeiti;type=0